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Deliberate Acts Of Giving From Around the Web

 

It’s that time of year when people all over the world are encouraged to give thanks for what we have reaped. Let us extend our gratitude for what we have to those who are less fortunate. Join me in committing to doing something simple, kind and deliberate for someone else this holiday season – and beyond.

 

In case you need ideas or a bit more inspiration, I’ve featured below some of my favorite stories of giving and gratitude from around the globe. Enjoy and give deliberately!

 

~ Reet Alexander

www.AllThingsNONPROFIT.org

 

 

Stories Of Inspiration From The Charitable Community

 

 

Excerpt from Three Painless Ways to Increase Your Giving By Brad Hurley

Saving $30 per month translates to $360 annually, and when I saw that figure I realized that I had just discovered an easy, no-sacrifice way to give even more than I already do to effective charities. It turns out there are lots of opportunities like this, which can be broken into three categories: 1) Eliminating things you pay for but don’t actually use, 2) Replacing things you buy frequently with cheaper but just-as-good alternatives, and 3) Giving “found money,” which can include things like credit card cash-back rewards or even money found on the sidewalk. The final step is to tally up your savings and ensure that they go to your chosen charity(ies) instead of getting absorbed back into your monthly spending. Click here to read more.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/brad-hurley/three-painless-ways-to-in_b_8638486.html

 

 

Excerpt from Gratitude: Good for the Soul and Helps the Heart, Too By Patti Neighmond

So he did a study. He recruited 186 men and women, average age 66, who already had some damage to their heart, either through years of sustained high blood pressure or as a result of heart attack or even an infection of the heart itself. They each filled out a standard questionnaire to rate how grateful they felt for the people, places or things in their lives. It turned out the more grateful people were, the healthier they were. “They had less depressed mood, slept better and had more energy,” says Mills. And when Mills did blood tests to measure inflammation, the body’s natural response to injury, or plaque buildup in the arteries, he found lower levels among those who were grateful — an indication of better heart health. Click here to read more.

http://www.dailygood.org/more.php?n=6535

 

 

Excerpt from Tiny Houses Built With a Big Heart

Some may see the makeshift tents and tarps that line the streets merely as garbage or eyesores, but Gregory Kloehn sees a game plan. Inspired by the improvised shelters that homeless people craft, Kloehn, the founder of Homeless Homes from Oakland, California, decided to start making his own “mini” homes with material mainly sourced from waste. With 35 houses built and counting, these miniature houses serve as a personal form of shelter for many homeless individuals. They give the residents an area that is dry, warm, and private. Most importantly, it is a safe space they can call their own. – See more at:

http://www.karmatube.org/videos.php?id=6484#sthash.NkCxljbV.dpuf

 

 

Excerpt from STEM May Become STEAM. . .Officially By John M. Eger

Like most you, perhaps, things just don’t seem to get done in Washington D.C. so I discounted the fact that a Congressional Caucus on STEAM, adding the arts to the call for more Scientists, Technologists, Engineers and Mathematicians was formed in 2013. The goal was modest: to “host briefings and advocate for policy changes that will encourage educators to integrate arts, broadly defined, with traditional Science, Technology, Engineering and Math curriculum. The goal is to encourage the creativity needed to drive our innovation economy forward.”

It was nice, I thought, but probably just another minority voice to the call for arts and arts integration in our schools.

I was wrong and I am elated. Click to read more.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-m-eger/stem-may-become-steamoffi_b_8634126.html

 

 

Excerpt from The Conditioned: A Sidewalk Poet Finds His Home

Raimundo Arruda Sobrinho was a homeless poet, living for decades on a roadway median in Sao Paulo, Brazil, he called “The Island.” Though his circumstances were dire, he wrote each day with diligence and passion. His dream was to share his work with the world; but he lived fundamentally disconnected from others. Or did he? This film speaks to the inherent interconnections among all of us and the astonishing things that can happen when we allow them to manifest. – See more at:

http://www.karmatube.org/videos.php?id=4895#sthash.8FOZMCQR.dpuf

 

 

Excerpt from Random Acts of Kindness – 17 Ideas for Raising Grateful and Kind Kids By Brad Aronson

We won’t be able to preserve Jack’s innocence forever, but he absorbs so much of what we say and do, that we have an opportunity to purposefully do things that we hope will help mold Jack into a caring and compassionate person. With that in mind, my wife and I have been thinking about how to make sure our son is grateful, kind and compassionate. We have no idea what we’re doing, but here are some ideas and related thoughts…Click here to read more.

http://www.bradaronson.com/random-acts-of-kindness/